Music Amidst the Chaos: My Top Albums of 2019

In spite of the political turmoil and trauma taking place on both sides of the Atlantic and throughout the rest of the world, art and music has stepped into the void, nurturing forward thinking conversation and holding up a mirror to our way of life, which is no longer serving us. Perhaps political chaos and … Continue reading Music Amidst the Chaos: My Top Albums of 2019

The pain never goes away; an Iranian refugee’s story

When the Iranian revolution happened in 1979 and the dictatorship of the Shah ended, Zohreh and many millions like her were full of hope – they yearned for freedom, liberty and equal rights for women and men. It was not to be. Instead Zohreh endured years in jail, was lashed and tortured and saw her … Continue reading The pain never goes away; an Iranian refugee’s story

‘The Hurting Kind’ – John Paul White

Each song on John Paul White’s album The Hurting Kind (April 12th on Single Lock) is its own hurting kind. White is careful not to equate romantic love as the only thing that hurts but rather leaving it open to all things, whether that be time moving on and the hurt of looking back on what … Continue reading ‘The Hurting Kind’ – John Paul White

John Paul White – Live at Omeara

Happy is not a word that is usually associated with John Paul White’s music. Full of longing, heartbreakingly beautiful but definitely not happy. But in this case, White brought the sweetener, bringing the bitter taste to a halt. White opened with ‘I Wish I Could Write You a Song’ delivered in his pure and haunting … Continue reading John Paul White – Live at Omeara

Aretha Franklin’s Living Memory: an essay on the collective loss of historical memory

Soul music has always seemed to me the music that people need when they’ve been sufficiently beaten down by the world, and just need something that can put them back together again. Whether it’s Al Green’s ‘Let’s Stay Together’, Sam Cooke’s 'Just For You’, Etta James’ ‘I’d Rather Go Blind’ or Aretha Franklin’s ‘Respect’, these … Continue reading Aretha Franklin’s Living Memory: an essay on the collective loss of historical memory

‘Stay Lucky’: an interview with Nerina Pallot

Three years ago, Nerina Pallot released The Sound and the Fury an intensely political record that reckoned with the death and legacy of Margaret Thatcher, the murder of Lee Rigby, the now-closed refugee camp in Calais, and the intricacies of navigating the world as a woman. The record was infused with electro-pop and heavy synths and … Continue reading ‘Stay Lucky’: an interview with Nerina Pallot